The following information is from an article in the “Over the Waves” by Bev King.
The National Archives has scanned thousands of pages of Navy Ships Deck Logs during Vietnam. The AE ships are
at the top of the priority list.
Go to https://www.archives.gov/research/military/logbooks/navy-online   That brings you to an alpha list of ship
names. Here are the ships which have scanned deck logs.
USS Butte AE-27 1960-69, 1970-79
USS Chara AE-31 1966-1970
USS Firedrake AE-14 1961-65 70, 71
USS Great Sitken AE-17 1960-79 50-59
USS Haleakala AE-25 1960-69 70-79
USS Mauna Kea AE-22 1960-69 70-79
USS Mazama AE-9 1960-69 70, 79
USS Mt Baker AE-4 1960-69
USS Mount Katmai AE-16 1960-69 70, 79
USS Nitro AE-23 1960-69 70, 79
USS Pyro AE-24 1960-69 70, 79
USS Rainier AE-5 1960-70 70-79
USS Santa Barbara AE-28 1970-79
USS Seattle AOE- 3 1971, 74
USS Shasta AE-6 1960-69
USS Suribachi AE-21 1960-69 70-79
USS Vesuvius AE-15 1960-69 70-79
USS Virgo AE-30 1960-69 70-79
USS Wrangell AE-12 1960-69 70-79

Pick a year you are interested in and select. Not all the items are in sequence so look over the list to the end. The
Deck Log book is kept by month with each days start explaining where the ship is and generally the condition at that
time i.e. which boiler(s) and generators were on line.  The officer of the deck would keep record of abnormal
conditions, injuries that occurred, personnel musters, speed changes and course changes. The comments can be
very vague.
It will take a little trial and error to learn how to move around the web site depending on your computer. I did fine on
my computer with touch screen that I could enlarge the copy with 2 fingers which make the page much more
readable. Each time you select a page you will have to enlarge it.
I have reviewed 2 situations. The first, a boiler explosion with a resultant tow into Da Nang.  The log recorded the
time of the explosion with GQ being sounded. After the ship was secured from GQ the log has very few entries
concerning the actual condition of the ship except that the emergency generator was suppling power.
The other was a normal stop in Hawaii that was extended due to a malfunction in the boiler room.  The deck log only
showed that the ship was towed by 4 tugs to a different pier and the ship went cold iron. No mention of the problem
or how it was found that a piece of equipment had been positioned improperly.

Wish you success in you venture, just keep paddling.
Kurt Julsen
Click below to view Navy Deck Logs
WWW.ARCHIVES.GOV